Andrew Laughlin

Assistant Professor
161 Rhoades-Robinson Hall
828.250.3993

Office Hours

  • Mon: 

    • 9:30 - 10:30 a.m.
  • Fri: 

    • 9:30 - 10:30 a.m.
  • Thu: 

    • 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dr. Laughlin teaches Principles of Ecology and Field Biology, Avian Ecology and Conservation, and Introduction to Environmental Studies. His research interests include movement and migration ecology and animal responses to environmental change, with a focus on birds. He uses a variety of techniques to examine animal movements, including geolocators and radio telemetry to track individuals, stable isotopes and Doppler weather radar to track populations, and large-scale citizen science data to understand changes in animal distribution and abundance.


Education

  • B.A.  Calvin College
  • M.S.  East Tennessee State University
  • Ph.D.  Tulane University, New Orleans, LA

Recent Publications

  • Fairhurst, G.D., L.L. Berzins, D.W. Bradley, A.J. Laughlin, A. Romano, M. Romano, et al.  [2015].  "Assessing costs of carrying geolocators using feather corticosterone in two species of aerial insectivore".  ROYAL SOCIETY OPEN SCIENCE 2:  150004.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.150004.
  • Laughlin, A.J., D.R. Sheldon, D.W. Winkler & C.M. Taylor.  [2014].  "Drivers of communal roosting in a songbird:  a combined theoretical and empirical approach.  BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY 25:734-743.
  • Bradley, W.D., R.G. Clark, P.O. Dunn, A.J. Laughlin, C.M. Taylor, C. Vleck, L.A. Whittingham, D.W. Winkler & D.R. Norris.  [2014].  "Trans-Gulf of Mexico loop migration of Tree Swallows revealed by solar geolocation".  CURRENT ZOOLOGY 60[5]:230-239.
  • Laughlin, A.J., C.M. Taylor, D.W. Bradley, D. LeClair, R.G. Clark, R.D. Dawson, et al.  [2013].  "Integrating information from geolocators, weather radar, and citizen science to uncover a key stopover area of an aerial insectivore".  THE AUK 130[2]:230-239.
  • Laughlin, A.J., I. Karsai, F.J. Alsop III.  [2013].  "Habitat partitioning and niche overlap of two forest thrushes in the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir forests".  THE CONDOR 115[2]:394-402.